High Quality Ebay Listings

Started by GoblinAhFuckScary, February 11, 2021, 05:45:13 PM

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mothman

Quote from: Gurke and Hare on October 27, 2021, 08:40:07 PM
Is there not some reputable museum or archive that would take it?
Not sure. It's not that unique, I think I've seen others for sale.

JesusAndYourBush

Quote from: mothman on October 27, 2021, 02:49:06 AM
I own a Nazi handkerchief.

No, really. A Nazi-Fascist one, even; it celebrates the pre-war pact between Germany and Italy, and has the logos of both parties on. A distant relative was in Italy (I think) when it was signed

Signed by that naughty man Hitler?


mothman

I wish. Stuff the moral considerations, I'd sell it to Nigel Farage himself for some serious dollar. No, I mean when the pact was signed.

Ray Travez

There was a guy at the car boot sale selling nazi candlesticks a few weeks back. Dunno what 'N Q' stands for- Nazi Quality? I didn't ask how much they were in case he thinks I like them and starts trying to sell them to me. Nothing worse than a persistent seller.



I'd sell the handkerchief personally. You never know, there might be a rich nazi somewhere with a snotty nose.

kalowski

There was a kid down my road who showed me a pile of Deutsch marks they'd found in his grandad's loft. They were all stamped with swastikas.
I told him to look after them as they were probably worth money and he said, "What do you mean? It is money!"
Think I'll have to scam him out of it.

Ferris

Quote from: kalowski on October 28, 2021, 10:23:17 AM
There was a kid down my road who showed me a pile of Deutsch marks they'd found in his grandad's loft. They were all stamped with swastikas.
I told him to look after them as they were probably worth money and he said, "What do you mean? It is money!"
Think I'll have to scam him out of it.

Unless there was a mistake down Das Printers[nb]yes I know the plural form is "Die" but "Das" is much funnier for gags about German[/nb] they'd be Reichmarks from that era, and I think they tastefully stuck to the eagle rather than utilizing the naughty cross we've come to know and despise. If it's got a swastika, it's an aftermarket addition by someone with a pen.

I mean... paging Buzby who will (of course) know more than me.

buttgammon

Quote from: FerriswheelBueller on October 28, 2021, 10:43:47 AM
Unless there was a mistake down Das Printers[nb]yes I know the plural form is "Die" but "Das" is much funnier for gags about German[/nb] they'd be Reichmarks from that era, and I think they tastefully stuck to the eagle rather than utilizing the naughty cross we've come to know and despise. If it's got a swastika, it's an aftermarket addition by someone with a pen.

I mean... paging Buzby who will (of course) know more than me.

I'm no Buzby but the Deutsche Mark was a post-war thing; anything from the Nazi era or the latter parts of the Weimar Republic is the Reichsmark.

I actually have some (pre-Nazi) Reichsmarks somewhere - they all have crazily high values because of hyperinflation, so it probably would've been a million marks for a loaf of bread or something similarly silly.

kalowski

I didn't get a proper look at them and he doesn't live around here any more so looks like my story will leave us guessing.

Janie Jones

Having been prompted by these recent posts and looked into it, I'm surprised to learn that it's not illegal to sell Nazi memorabilia in the UK as it is in several European countries. However Ebay won't allow it.

If you ever sell WW2 stuff like trench art or soldiers' kit on eBay you get a flurry of emails from dealers asking if you've got any Nazi stuff. I have, as it happens; 'souvenirs' like badges and buttons acquired by previous generations of my family but also stuff that was in use until recently like tools stamped with that Reichsmark eagle symbol or the swastika. I'm not sure what to do with it. I suppose I don't want it kicking around to be found by whoever empties the contents of my house into a skip when I'm dead. Next dealer who gets in touch, I'll sell it and give the money to an appropriate charity.

I've got some swastika greeting cards that pre-date its use by the Nazi party, it was often seen in good luck cards. When I first started work in the NHS in the early 90s, a doctor told me about his shock at seeing some of his elderly Hindu patients with fading swastika tattoos.

Ferris

Quote from: kalowski on October 28, 2021, 11:34:05 AM
I didn't get a proper look at them and he doesn't live around here any more so looks like my story will leave us guessing.

Probably just Scottish pound notes.

H-O-W-L

Quote from: holyzombiejesus on March 28, 2021, 06:25:55 PM
Empty whisky boxes and perfume bottles go for a bit apparently but never bothered myself.

Please be careful when you sell rarer whiskey boxes or bottles online -- fraudsters buy them and genuinely fill them with cheap or adulterated product and then try to sell them at auction.

H-O-W-L

I don't have any Nazi paraphernalia because I've always been more interested in Cold War stuff. I once bought a job lot of Czech gas masks (which I've since resold) and one of them was utterly saturated on the inside with what I can only presume was dried blood, as it was a dark brownish-red with no scent of poo but a disturbing scent of decay.

Ray Travez

Quote from: H-O-W-L on October 28, 2021, 12:51:51 PM
Please be careful when you sell rarer whiskey boxes or bottles online -- fraudsters buy them and genuinely fill them with cheap or adulterated product and then try to sell them at auction.

there also seems to be a market for empty perfume bottles, which I assume is for the same reason. (At least some of the time)

Ray Travez

Quote from: H-O-W-L on October 28, 2021, 12:55:19 PM
I once bought a job lot of Czech gas masks (which I've since resold) and one of them was utterly saturated on the inside with what I can only presume was dried blood, as it was a dark brownish-red with no scent of poo but a disturbing scent of decay.

bloody hell. Did people pay more or less for that one?


JesusAndYourBush

Quote from: buttgammon on October 28, 2021, 11:06:46 AM
I actually have some (pre-Nazi) Reichsmarks somewhere - they all have crazily high values because of hyperinflation, so it probably would've been a million marks for a loaf of bread or something similarly silly.

Yeah I've got some of those. Ein Billionen Mark and I think one is for a milliard whatever that is.
And when I collected stamps there was some with that Mr H on them.  As far as I'm aware they didn't put him on the banknotes though.
EDIT: Oh it's another name for a billion.

Ferris

Quote from: H-O-W-L on October 28, 2021, 12:51:51 PM
Please be careful when you sell rarer whiskey boxes or bottles online -- fraudsters buy them and genuinely fill them with cheap or adulterated product and then try to sell them at auction.

My dad got me 2 bottles of westvleteren 12 (that he brought across the Atlantic in his suitcase) several years ago "from eBay". Didn't have the heart to tell him they were pretty bad and definitely knockoffs in original bottles, though he was very pleased at how cheap they were so I'm glad he didn't overpay.

H-O-W-L

Quote from: Ray Travez on October 28, 2021, 01:00:45 PM
bloody hell. Did people pay more or less for that one?

I honestly just cut it up and binned it (wearing gloves obvs) because I don't want to deal in blood gear. It's a thing with surpluses, getting the odd bit of bloody gear, and it's not the first piece I've gotten that has been saturated with blood. Boots are the item I've encountered with blood on the most -- you can find pics of it online, I won't link/embed here, but the back tendon of boots often tend to rub if you do them up wrong, don't wear socks, or wear your socks too loose, so you end up with blood-soaked backs after a march.

It's often ghastly when it's something that's worn on the head, though, or if it's a chest piece. Worse still is if it's uniform with tags/flags/bars and the like still attached. I've never encountered anything with an official nametag still on, fortunately, but still. It's less likely to come off the war dead and more likely an injury sustained in training (or worse, a death sustained in training -- and there are dozens of those every year) but you never know.

Varusteleka, a very funny site that sells a lot of Finnish surplus, had a job lot of surplus stuff from the Balkans at one point that could've potentially been issued during the Yugoslav wars, and every single item they had was listed as, for example,  "GENOCIDE BLANKET - EVIL". They had a good take on it, IMO, in that they were selling it both as a historical curio and also with the "EVIl/GENOCIDE" markers not as a joke on the victims of said genocide, but to ensure that anyone who even cursorily looked at the item knew that it belonged to a unit that committed unspeakable things and wanted to cover it up. "To pretend that these items were not present at a genocide would be disingenuous, and would, to us, be like saying it never happened".


Quote from: H-O-W-L on October 29, 2021, 03:54:13 PM
I honestly just cut it up and binned it (wearing gloves obvs) because I don't want to deal in blood gear. It's a thing with surpluses, getting the odd bit of bloody gear, and it's not the first piece I've gotten that has been saturated with blood. Boots are the item I've encountered with blood on the most -- you can find pics of it online, I won't link/embed here, but the back tendon of boots often tend to rub if you do them up wrong, don't wear socks, or wear your socks too loose, so you end up with blood-soaked backs after a march.

It's often ghastly when it's something that's worn on the head, though, or if it's a chest piece. Worse still is if it's uniform with tags/flags/bars and the like still attached. I've never encountered anything with an official nametag still on, fortunately, but still. It's less likely to come off the war dead and more likely an injury sustained in training (or worse, a death sustained in training -- and there are dozens of those every year) but you never know.

Varusteleka, a very funny site that sells a lot of Finnish surplus, had a job lot of surplus stuff from the Balkans at one point that could've potentially been issued during the Yugoslav wars, and every single item they had was listed as, for example,  "GENOCIDE BLANKET - EVIL". They had a good take on it, IMO, in that they were selling it both as a historical curio and also with the "EVIl/GENOCIDE" markers not as a joke on the victims of said genocide, but to ensure that anyone who even cursorily looked at the item knew that it belonged to a unit that committed unspeakable things and wanted to cover it up. "To pretend that these items were not present at a genocide would be disingenuous, and would, to us, be like saying it never happened".

gosh this is pretty horrifying. does it not put you off doing the surplus stuff?

H-O-W-L

Quote from: GoblinAhFuckScary on October 29, 2021, 04:09:23 PM
gosh this is pretty horrifying. does it not put you off doing the surplus stuff?

Nah. I don't really mass buy/resell surplus stuff often, I've only done it with the masks and a couple cases of boots I saw very cheap, and in both cases I honestly I just wanted one of them for myself and it worked out cheaper/profitsome. It's a fact of life if you buy surplus or militaria though that sometimes what you buy will have been involved in some dubious, gruesome, or just freaky stuff, especially if you have an interest in Cold War styles like myself.

All the Nazi stuff mentioned up-thread scares me more, because it was made during one of the largest, most all-encompassing totalitarian regimes (and genocides) in the world, and, frankly speaking, a lot of Nazi guff was made via slave labor or profited from slavery at the least.

But again, it's kind of a fact of life -- a fact of history. To me, items that have a bit of historical scuff and grime are way more interesting and more appealing than ones that are mint from some warehouse. The Flecktarn jacket I bought as a cheap waterproof for rain-walks has the name of the dude who owned it before me written on the inside of the collar, for example, and that gives it so much more character and story than if I'd bought some new rain mac from some cunt factory that profits off near-slaves in the third world.

Not only that, but if you buy items that you can feasibly use (mess kits, canteens, boots, jackets, etc.) whether camping or day-to-day (my messenger bag I used to use for work is former British surplus too for example)  you give some of the acres of trash that militaries produce to fulfil their quotas and satisfy the mil-industry-complex a new, peaceful home. To me it's a positive form of swords into ploughshares -- not least because a percentage of surplus is relatively knocked off. Not necessarily downright stolen, but it wasn't necessarily meant to leave where it was.

buttgammon

These posts are really interesting, H-O-W-L. I'd be too unsettled to touch something that had possibly been used in nefarious acts but your idea of putting them to good use still sounds like a positive thing, a bit like the opposite of the insidiously awful way militaries can co-opt civilian technologies.

H-O-W-L

When it comes to stuff that genuinely could've been used in a nefarious act, such as Varusteleka's Genocide Canteen, Evil, I would legitimately only consider buying it for curio/display purposes, I wouldn't want to actually use it because it could be seen as condoning the acts of the original intended users and their crimes, IMO. Just like how I'd never wear Nazi gear or even some eras of Soviet gear (Afghan especially). But I think it's also important that these things survive and are documented, known, handled, seen in person.

I've always read about the Holocaust and world genocides and stuff but I genuinely did not really feel the absolute weight of that sort of horror until I went to the IWM and saw their Holocaust Galleries -- can't remember when but it would've been a few years ago now. It genuinely humbled me and brought me to tears to see physical, tangible items from an era of absolute horror. Seeing these things is important. Artefacts remaining is important, even if it's just a canteen that someone who probably didn't participate in a genocide that was attributed to his army once used. Because it reminds us these things happened, here and now, in the material plane. Not just in the pages of books.

I don't think the same applies to statues of cunts, for what it's worth. Statues weren't there. You won't see statues in photographs of the damned like you will the prisoner garbs on display in the IWM, or in the purchase and quiet menace that a swastika-stamped candlestick has, or a red-star branded ushanka. These things show the domination of these large and terrible regimes, and bring home, IMO, just how real they were.

Everything I own and use right now is mostly stuff that's just assuredly boring Cold War masspro stuff, which is why I have an interest in it; West German and post-reunification German Bundeswehr stuff, along with stuff from the British army and could be anywhere from 1960 to the late 90s. I have a collection of gas masks from other countries too (including what were technically oppressed Soviet satellites) but obviously I don't use them. Worst that could've happened with the stuff I have and use (boots, jackets) is someone died in them during training, and honestly I take the same view of that like I do of stuff in charity shops; someone could've died in them.

Probably my biggest issue with surplus is that so much of it just goes to waste -- often it gets worn out of military spec -- which often means it's truly fucked -- and then tossed into the junk pile, but even then you have warehouses filled to the gills with uniforms, boots, pouches, bags, etc-- which could easily be redistributed to the homeless or impoverished... and it never does. Military gear of all kinds would be of insane use to the homeless; I've never met a better set of waterproofs than the surplus jackets I've found, and they're so cheap too, often £10 a jacket, down to even £5 during eras of oversupply.

Alberon

My Grandad had a WWII era German Iron Cross medal. He wasn't awarded it, he found it in a drawer in a port shortly after the end of the war.

We've had the medals he was actually awarded by our side framed and mounted with the Iron Cross on the back. No idea what it's worth.

Dex Sawash

Quote from: H-O-W-L on October 29, 2021, 06:29:06 PM
When it comes to stuff that genuinely could've been used in a nefarious act, such as Varusteleka's Genocide Canteen, Evil, I

QuoteInside the mess kit is the canteen, a cubic thing holding about a liter (1 qt) or a little less. There is an inscription on the thing which we can't read and won't be bothered to study. We think it is a warning against putting water into the canteen. Based on the movie Alien, we know that all kinds of messages you don't understand are probably warnings

Do we report outside writers to the guffaw thread?

touchingcloth

Quote from: Alberon on October 29, 2021, 07:29:43 PM
My Grandad had a WWII era German Iron Cross medal. He wasn't awarded it, he found it in a drawer in a port shortly after the end of the war.

The Nazi insignia was just resting in his account, huh?

mothman

That's a very interesting story, Alberon - or should I say, Oberst von Alberoffen?

JesusAndYourBush

In the 80's we found a secret drawer in chest/cabinet at my Gran's house that she was unaware of, and inside was a little carved wooden box with an iron cross in it.  It's crudely made and at the time we had a theory that it was what's called a 'field decoration', basically a crude version you're given until you can be given the real thing later. (I've no idea if that was even a thing or just a made up plausible theory.)
Anway, last year I Googled it and it's not a real iron cross at all but a British made thing for propaganda purposes.  Basically this thing here.

studpuppet

My dad used to collect banknotes, and the pride of his collection was a fake five pound note from a batch that the Germans tried to flood our economy with during WW2. Compared to the real ones it wasn't a bad attempt - it had been stamped 'Fałszywy' (the Polish for 'False') across it. Never understood why it was stamped in Polish - perhaps it had been discovered there after hostilities ended.