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THings you find hauntological that no one else does

Started by George White, June 29, 2022, 11:01:17 PM

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Cuntbeaks

Picture Box. The theme tune to an LSD trip spiralling out of control


Captain Z

The thing with 90s nostalgia is that's it's so vibrant, all luminous green, purple, pink and yellow, that you just can't feel too down about it.

Through The Dragon's Eye, though, I feel that. Too young to fully understand it at the time, but the Veetacore exploding was basically a child's introduction to nuclear accidents.

jamiefairlie

Quote from: The Ombudsman on July 04, 2022, 11:24:11 AMThis count?

Surprised it was repeated tbh.



Look and Read had some classic era hauntos...




jamiefairlie

God I'd love spend a few hours back in this land, forever in my memory but always out of reach, sigh


Mister Six

Quote from: The Ombudsman on July 04, 2022, 11:24:11 AMThis count?

Surprised it was repeated tbh.



Tomorrow I'm gonna try to find the moment those Global Hypercolor cunts get melted by the thing made of bird bones and sticks.

There were four in that series that we watched, c. 1987. Geordie Racer and Badger Girl were two. I forget the other. Or maybe I'm imagining it.

Icehaven


The Ombudsman

Quote from: Mister Six on July 05, 2022, 04:12:07 AMThere were four in that series that we watched, c. 1987. Geordie Racer and Badger Girl were two. I forget the other. Or maybe I'm imagining it.

I remember those two as well, and my terrible maths places it at around the same period.

I think it was Geordie Racer where I learned about (excuse spelling) stotties. Really fancied one and 35 years later have still yet to try them.

The Ombudsman

Quote from: jamiefairlie on July 05, 2022, 03:45:06 AMLook and Read had some classic era hauntos...

I don't remember those, maybe a little before my time.

These do bring back memories of the big telly on wheels with the doors with the fabric brim to keep the lights off the telly. And the massive Ferguson VHS in it's secure cage.

sovietrussia

Sorry to drag it back to idents/VHS, but this always held a casual melancholy for me, even at the time.


Norton Canes

Has this turned into 'THings you find hauntological that everyone else does'

Pavlov`s Dog`s Dad`s Dead

I've ended up living a mile or so down the road from where my paternal grandparents used to live. There are woods nearby where my grandad used to take me for walks, and he'd show me strange vertical semi-circular lines in the rocks where they'd drilled holes for dynamite, to blast a track at a more-or-less manageable incline through what would otherwise have remained a sheer cliff. I've seen them again just this morning, while walking the dog, yet I still don't quite believe they exist, or that my grandad ever pointed them out, or that the Victorians ever really blasted that track. It's just a weird, gloomy chasm, barely troubled by the sunlight, that runs under a private road where rumour has it one of the Grumbleweeds lives. But Gasmask Grimshaw is a whole hother hauntological matter.

Sebastian Cobb

Quote from: sovietrussia on July 05, 2022, 11:23:44 AMSorry to drag it back to idents/VHS, but this always held a casual melancholy for me, even at the time.







Captain Z

Quote from: Mister Six on July 05, 2022, 04:12:07 AMThere were four in that series that we watched, c. 1987. Geordie Racer and Badger Girl were two. I forget the other. Or maybe I'm imagining it.

Sky Hunter?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TyqzkoqzCZk

JesusAndYourBush

#163
Anyone know which BBC schools tv show (late 70s?) it was that had a really crudely animated little man, quite badly drawn.

I was thinking it was called Wordy but that's the orange thing in the Look And Read clips a few posts back.  The thing I'm thinking of was a crude line drawing, quite messy.  Just a line drawing in one colour (white/off-white), probably done on transparencies and overlaid onto the film.  At the time I found it quite unsettling.

Mister Six

Quote from: Captain Z on July 05, 2022, 12:59:01 PMSky Hunter?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TyqzkoqzCZk

Ah, yeah, that looks about right. I don't recall the name, but I do remember a bird like that. Unless I'm thinking of the 20 annual showings of Kes that were mandatory in all northern schools in the 1980s.

Norton Canes

Quote from: JesusAndYourBush on July 05, 2022, 01:06:03 PMAnyone know which BBC schools tv show (late 70s?) it was that had a really crudely animated little man, quite badly drawn.

I was thinking it was called Wordy but that's the orange thing in the Look And Read clips a few posts back.  The thing I'm thinking of was a crude line drawing, quite messy.  Just a line drawing in one colour (white/off-white), probably done on transparencies and overlaid onto the film.  At the time I found it quite unsettling

Was that the one that was not so much animated, as sort of just squashed up and down?

JesusAndYourBush

Quote from: Norton Canes on July 05, 2022, 03:38:03 PMWas that the one that was not so much animated, as sort of just squashed up and down?

Yeah!  I thought it'd be easier to find but I'm having no luck.

jobotic

It's Wordy from Words & Pictures, which I've been meaning to put in the TV Themes thread.

gilbertharding

I find this image has a haunted quality and it's hard to explain why:



It's a Google Earth shot of the North end of Maidstone in 1990.

An image of the same spot of land is also available on Google Earth from c.1960, and most years from 2005 - but for some reason none of these have the same haunted quality.

Sebastian Cobb

Quote from: jobotic on July 05, 2022, 05:25:45 PMIt's Wordy from Words & Pictures, which I've been meaning to put in the TV Themes thread.

Apparently the bloke who plays him does/did work in a hardware shop in Bristol according to my mate in Bristol. And Look and Read, which wordy was on, was produced by BBC Bristol by the looks of it.

badaids


Surely hauntology is generational and specific to each generation though.

So in 20 years Mr Tumble, Babylon by David Gray and MySpace will all be woooooooooo hauntological.

Zetetic

Quote from: badaids on July 05, 2022, 06:01:59 PMSurely hauntology is generational and specific to each generation though.
If it didn't now mean "reminds some codgers of the '70s".

Being more generous, there is something useful about that usage, reflecting the long persistence of a particular cultural moment (and one ripe for "retrofuturism"?) into the "end of history" era. If I've understood the Fisher-ish use of the term.

Zetetic

Quote from: Norton Canes on July 05, 2022, 12:11:27 PMHas this turned into 'THings you find hauntological that everyone else does'

To try to drag it a bit more towards the OP:

I now find any warbling on about the social determinants of health and the importance of healthy relationships or the importance of dealing with illnesses sooner rather than later, as if these thoughts were novel, vaguely haunting if nothing else. This constant repetition for half-a-century or more as if it were being constantly understood for the first time, alongside a general sense of having stalled out from really taking any of it seriously (which is an unfair gloss on the last 50 years, but less so on the last 10 at least). Weird tension between the tone of novelty and the sense of never being able to escape the moment of rediscovery. (Even weirder when sometimes it is accompanied by an acknowledgement that it's not really new!)

Corporate t-shirts, although the thread suggests that other people do as well, I think.

 

Zetetic

Any bar charts with three bars going up:
Quote from: Zetetic on November 28, 2021, 11:26:09 PMI'd have to go with the der erste sozialistische Staat der Arbeiter und Bauern auf deutschem Boden, as amply demonstrated by these bar charts.



(More bar charts of a similar layout are available.)

#174
Quote from: Zetetic on July 05, 2022, 06:08:06 PMIf it didn't now mean "reminds some codgers of the '70s".

Being more generous, there is something useful about that usage, reflecting the long persistence of a particular cultural moment (and one ripe for "retrofuturism"?) into the "end of history" era. If I've understood the Fisher-ish use of the term.


I think it has to do with the fact that the era where reproductions and copies of media became affordable for regular consumers coincided with final victory of free market politics and the twilight of communism.

The generational aspect I suppose comes from the fact that only codgers now remember the pre-digital era where the original had value over the copy, where it was desirable to experience the real thing: the original broadcast over a VHS, a record over a cassette dub, the book and not the photocopy, the photograph and not a newspaper print, etc. The more time that passes between the haydays of the VHS and the walkman and the more digital media becomes second nature, the less expressible the importance that used to be attached to minor distinctions between real versions and copies and the more general nostalgia around this seems hopelessy specific when people talk about. Most importantly, a digital "copy" of somthing isn't a "copy" in the sense of being an iteration any more - if you move an MP3 from your computer to your phone, you couldn't really call that an act of representation.

And there's that these shifts started to get in gear at just the right time to hit Continental thinking about the distinction between presentation and representation that involves technology and iteration, and in a way that is a fairly unique coincidence between trends in ideas and the way the world was changing. It hard to maintain a pre-war fascination with authenticity and the pure presence of original experiences when repetition becomes the normal way of interacting with ideas and media. There's probably a class inversion going on here as well, since its also a time where highbrow art and theory becomes obsessed with reproduction but advertisements and lowbrow things sell themselves on the authenticity of "the real thing". The pop culture legacy of the 1970s and 1980s sometimes seems like a mountain of repeating junk that used to exist to proclaim itself "the real thing" or sell some experience as authentic or original, all in the shadow of the death of the "grand narratives" of emancipation and justice - a death that people were told they should be celebrating. This is all especially ironic considering the death of the idea of "ideology" in the Marxist sense was supposedly the biggest victory of the era, as we're now post-ideology and its increasingly offensive to suggest that some people have a "false consciousness" of their reality.

For Derrida in particular this all is very emblematic of the times, because there is something significant about Marx refering to communism as a "spectre that is haunting Europe", so it puts him on the side of dispersion, iteration and representation rather than presence and cultishness around authenticity. Especially in the form of ideas about a singular true communism that failed, or a single history that could end. The idea of a strictly retrospective Marxism is a contradiction in terms, since Marx's ideas concerns ways in which plural pasts persists in the present.
 
But I don't think Spectres of Marx is Derrida at his most interesting at all, honestly I find its popularity and influence hard to understand because its a poor book about Marx and not a great expression of deconstruction. I can see why Fisher and other versions have taken over from the original.

Definitely remember the older sister in the Queen's Nose falling into a pond.

Also, that kid, Timm, and his lost laugh.

80s Hanna-Barbera Productions logo, with that indescribable "swirling" sting that doesn't sound like any instrument known to man.


JesusAndYourBush

#177
Quote from: jobotic on July 05, 2022, 05:25:45 PMIt's Wordy from Words & Pictures, which I've been meaning to put in the TV Themes thread.

Are you sure?  Earlier I had an idea that it might have been Words and Pictures but the video I found had a Wordy that looked the same as the Wordy from Look And Read, i.e.this thing...

...only it was about the size of a tennis ball and lowered down on a piece of string.  I shall; look again at another episode...

EDIT: Ah!  The video I saw was Look & Read mislabelled as Words & Pictures.

thenoise

Seeing fashion that is the same as stuff I remember buying (or,more accurately, coveting while wearing my brother's handmedowns) the last time it was fashionable.
Its a sure sign that this shop isn't for people like me any more. What are you doing in Zara, buying clothes for your son? M&S is that way, idiot.

thenoise

Also, massive old fashioned coins. No wonder everyone wore such baggy trousers.