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Forums => General Bullshit => Topic started by: Nice Relaxing Poo on March 09, 2019, 10:17:19 PM

Title: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Nice Relaxing Poo on March 09, 2019, 10:17:19 PM
I'm from the North East and I've always liked the word "pagger" for having a punch up.


"I paggered that cunt and no mistake about it, he was looking at 'wor pint!"
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: touchingcloth on March 09, 2019, 10:23:25 PM
Not obscure, but I wish I could get away with using “gegging”. It’s a great word and concept.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: The Culture Bunker on March 09, 2019, 10:25:36 PM
I'm from the North East and I've always liked the word "pagger" for having a punch up.


"I paggered that cunt and no mistake about it, he was looking at 'wor pint!"
Over the other end of the A69/66 in Cumbria, we used "brayed" for that.

Other random Cumrbian slang words:

Lowp - jump
fettle - feel ("aars fettle?" "aars reet, marra")
jameater-  some wanker from Workington
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: BlodwynPig on March 09, 2019, 10:29:33 PM
I'm from the North East and I've always liked the word "pagger" for having a punch up.


"I paggered that cunt and no mistake about it, he was looking at 'wor pint!"

Pagger? Hartlepool?
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: BlodwynPig on March 09, 2019, 10:30:23 PM
Over the other end of the A69/66 in Cumbria, we used "brayed" for that.

Other random Cumrbian slang words:

Lowp - jump
fettle - feel ("aars fettle?" "aars reet, marra")
jameater-  some wanker from Workington

In Newcastle we use brayed too, so I reckon NRP is a "southerner", i.e. Teeside or below.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Nice Relaxing Poo on March 09, 2019, 10:35:00 PM
In Newcastle we use brayed too, so I reckon NRP is a "southerner", i.e. Teeside or below.

Guilty. I'm from Richmond Nth Yorks.

Brayed was also used a lot in our lexicon, that's why I said it has to be obscure. Pagger is a word I've only heard in certain circles, my guess is that it's a Newcastle word as I've seen it in Viz way back when.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Voltan (Man of Steel) on March 09, 2019, 10:41:19 PM
Yampy - daft, losing it.

"Ee's proper yampy, ay ee?"
"I'd keep out of Gaz's way if I were you - ee's gooin' fuckin' yampy"
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: BlodwynPig on March 09, 2019, 10:43:21 PM
Guilty. I'm from Richmond Nth Yorks.

Brayed was also used a lot in our lexicon, that's why I said it has to be obscure. Pagger is a word I've only heard in certain circles, my guess is that it's a Newcastle word as I've seen it in Viz way back when.

Posh southerner too!

I may have heard pagger as a child - whenever I hear local slang that is unfamiliar, I try and imagine my cousin saying it and if it sounds right coming out of his mouth then I agree it's genuine.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Mrs Wogans lemon drizzle on March 09, 2019, 11:03:03 PM
A sleeping child is said to be "hard on" in Hull.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Danger Man on March 09, 2019, 11:09:10 PM
'duck' is usually thought to be an East Midlands term of affection but it's also used by the yokels in Buckinghamshire. What's left of them.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: biggytitbo on March 09, 2019, 11:26:20 PM
Duck in Hull is used for a kind of small meatloaf (the food, not the fat singer).


My favorite Hull one is patty, which is colloquial slang for a ladies american back fanny.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: canadagoose on March 09, 2019, 11:26:35 PM
Lowp - jump
Quite common over the border, too, at least amongst my granny's generation. "Lowpin ower the dyke" and all that.

I tend to end up picking up words from wherever I'm living. I'm not sure if it's due to being a linguistic obsessive or just wanting to fit in. In terms of where I'm from, I still manage to use "platchin"/"drookit" (very wet) and "plitter" (muck about) now and then.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: gib on March 09, 2019, 11:48:21 PM
Quite common over the border, too, at least amongst my granny's generation. "Lowpin ower the dyke" and all that.

I'm betting that goes wayyyy back

Quote
Old Saxon hlopan, Old Norse hlaupa, Old Frisian hlapa, Dutch lopen, Old High German hlouffan, German laufen

https://www.etymonline.com/word/leap#etymonline_v_6625
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: canadagoose on March 09, 2019, 11:51:10 PM
I'm betting that goes wayyyy back

https://www.etymonline.com/word/leap#etymonline_v_6625
Huh, I hadn't made the link between "leap" and "lowp". Makes sense, mind.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: biggytitbo on March 09, 2019, 11:57:04 PM
I heard today in some parts of the country a croggy goes by the name of 'pegging', which I always thought was the act of a lady giving a man a good seeing to up the arse with a strap-on dildo.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: gib on March 10, 2019, 12:13:55 AM
Huh, I hadn't made the link between "leap" and "lowp". Makes sense, mind.

mind = remember, that's country slang. This is fun.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: canadagoose on March 10, 2019, 12:16:09 AM
mind = remember, that's country slang. This is fun.
Oh yeah, I'd say most Scots speakers would say "mind" for "remember". "Div ye mind..." I always find it funny when people try to speak "properly" and drop that in there. "Oh yes, I definitely do mind of that".
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: gib on March 10, 2019, 12:22:41 AM
I heard today in some parts of the country a croggy goes by the name of 'pegging', which I always thought was the act of a lady giving a man a good seeing to up the arse with a strap-on dildo.

Not sure about this one but etymonline has this
Quote
Middle Dutch pegel "little knob used as a mark," Dutch peil "gauge, watermark, standard"), of uncertain origin; perhaps from PIE *bak- "staff used as support" 
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Cuntbeaks on March 10, 2019, 12:25:18 AM
Weapon - Used to describe someone who is not only a danger to themselves, but others.

"Settle doon you ya fucking weapon, yir gonna get jailed"
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Twed on March 10, 2019, 12:43:11 AM
Was calling people "extra" around 1994/1995 a South-East regional thing? Also can anybody explain how that slang made a resurgence on American Twitter around 2017? Were my kinfolk saying it 25 years ago because they got it from American TV or something?
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Large Noise on March 10, 2019, 02:02:03 AM
“Ticket”- a tough guy.

As in “think yer a fuckin ticket wee man?”

Glasgow slang, but most weegies don’t know it.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on March 10, 2019, 04:12:37 AM
Quote
. “That’s Leeds is that”

Translation: “That’s fantastic”


Oh yes. Some of the more hardcore locals love Leeds so much they regularly use it as a positive adjective. An attractive woman? She’s Leeds. How’s your day going? Pretty Leeds, ta.. You get the picture. Only really used by the most Leeds of Leeds folk.

Fucking mental
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Twed on March 10, 2019, 04:13:57 AM
"Muggy bonehead" was local to a single TV show.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on March 10, 2019, 04:18:14 AM
Always liked "sen" for self.

There's no better use than for "shat mesen"
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Bronzy on March 10, 2019, 04:30:04 AM
Fud like a punched lasagna
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on March 10, 2019, 04:38:43 AM
Anyone heard "liggered" as in

"Ah wer proper liggered" ?
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: H-O-W-L on March 10, 2019, 07:46:22 AM
Duck in Hull is used for a kind of small meatloaf (the food, not the fat singer).

WOULDNT BE SMALL IF IT WAS HIM WOULD IT OIIIIIIII
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: MidnightShambler on March 10, 2019, 09:59:05 AM
I've drawn a blank with this cos I've realised I speak in an incomprehensible Scouse patois at all times and only get to use the proper version of the language when I'm posting on here, it's ridiculous. I think that's why everybody around town is on the cusp of a fight, nobody has got the slightest fucking clue what anybody else is talking about.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on March 10, 2019, 10:19:32 AM
I'm betting that goes wayyyy back

https://www.etymonline.com/word/leap#etymonline_v_6625

A chance "eloping" has the same origin?
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Pingers on March 10, 2019, 10:52:19 AM
Plenty of good Sheffield ones:

Clumpit - daft person
Loppy - dirty (a lop is a flea, in old Norse I think)
I'll stand hanging - I'm amazed
I'll go t' foot o' our stairs - I'm amazed
It's like plaiting fog - this is impossible
You've shit yer pot full - I am not giving you any more chances (a personal favourite)
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 10, 2019, 11:26:18 AM
“Ticket”- a tough guy.

As in “think yer a fuckin ticket wee man?”

Glasgow slang, but most weegies don’t know it.

i'm quite impressed with the versatility of the word 'rattle'.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: MidnightShambler on March 10, 2019, 11:35:45 AM
My mate who's in his 70s often fondly recalls drinking in a certain pub in Bootle because he was 'turking' the barmaid and used to get a stay-behind on a Sunday night. Never heard that one used anywhere else.

'Stay-behind' as well, now I think of it. Most other places call it a lock-in I think.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: alan nagsworth on March 10, 2019, 01:25:14 PM
I've a mate from Darlington who loves the word "radge". If something is mental or dangerous or scary, it's proper radged.

Glasgow slang amazes me. A bunch of my mates are Glaswags and some of the stuff I've picked up off them is brilliant. Insult terms like "wand", "jouster" and as has already been mentioned, "weapon". Love it.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: NattyDread 2 on March 10, 2019, 01:51:56 PM
I've a mate from Darlington who loves the word "radge". If something is mental or dangerous or scary, it's proper radged.

That'd be 'pure radge' in Edinburgh. 'Ticket' was mentioned earlier, I've never heard that relate to a hardman, but as a synonym for say, a numpty or a radge.
Do you get 'coupon' used for face anywhere else? Or 'pus' for that matter?
More Edinburgh ones I miss hearing - 'barry' - great and 'shan' - shite or unfair. Both also commonly preceded by 'pure'.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Nice Relaxing Poo on March 10, 2019, 01:53:30 PM

Glasgow slang amazes me. A bunch of my mates are Glaswags and some of the stuff I've picked up off them is brilliant. Insult terms like "wand", "jouster" and as has already been mentioned, "weapon". Love it.


"Roaster" is a good Glaswegian one too.


Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 10, 2019, 01:56:20 PM
Rocket and all.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Jockice on March 11, 2019, 06:58:41 AM
Plenty of good Sheffield ones:

Clumpit - daft person
Loppy - dirty (a lop is a flea, in old Norse I think)
I'll stand hanging - I'm amazed
I'll go t' foot o' our stairs - I'm amazed
It's like plaiting fog - this is impossible
You've shit yer pot full - I am not giving you any more chances (a personal favourite)

Lopper.  That used to be the common name for rockers (mainly the 'grebo' type) when I was a lad.

And from my home town near Glasgow, women were regularly called hen and to be drunk is either to be steaming or burling.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Ray Travez on March 11, 2019, 10:15:58 AM
Nowty- someone who is both moody and aggressive. Manchester, possibly obselete.

Gimmer- an old person. Is this just Northern or is it national?
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: hummingofevil on March 11, 2019, 10:31:54 AM
Despite not being an authentic Geordie I have spent last dozen years working with thousands of the little shits. I can confirm that ”pagger“ is very commonly used to mean a fight or fighting and “bray“ is used to mean beating some one up.

So you might get brayed if you engage in a pagger.

You can also say you might get paggered if you engage in a pagger but I have only ever heard brayed used as a verb.

Other terms I like:

- Hockle - to produce a particularly viscous greeny (that what we would call it in Wrexham - is that universal). To gob on something. To spit.

- Honkers - haunches

The most localised one I know is the word “dut“ from Hartlepool that appears to only be in use in town centre areas as locals I spoke to from outskirts had never heard of it. Means a hat.

Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Blinder Data on March 11, 2019, 10:38:00 AM
“That’s Leeds is that”

Translation: “That’s fantastic”

Desolation.

Glasgow is very good for slang. Even if you're unfamiliar with the meaning, it's often quite self-explanatory.

My fave might be fouter, as in "stop foutering about!". I wonder if it's etymology is French ("foutre"). Though that might be pan-Scotland and not just west coast.

Can't think of any good Manchester ones. "Snide" must be pronounced "sniiiiiiiiiiiide" for full effect.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: hummingofevil on March 11, 2019, 10:40:41 AM
Pure shan and gan radge are also very much part of the contemporary Geordie lexicon. I worked with loads of kids with English as second language and shan seemed to be the first word they all learned.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: buzby on March 11, 2019, 11:01:16 AM
My mate who's in his 70s often fondly recalls drinking in a certain pub in Bootle because he was 'turking' the barmaid and used to get a stay-behind on a Sunday night. Never heard that one used anywhere else.

'Stay-behind' as well, now I think of it. Most other places call it a lock-in I think.
On the subject of 'ticket', we have dirty ticket, as in someone of low virtue.
Meff and Blert are my favourite scouse putdowns, the latter of which is thankfully making a bit of a comeback of late.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Clatty McCutcheon on March 11, 2019, 11:16:26 AM
That'd be 'pure radge' in Edinburgh. 'Ticket' was mentioned earlier, I've never heard that relate to a hardman, but as a synonym for say, a numpty or a radge.

A ‘hard ticket’ or ‘a right hard ticket’ is a hard man in Glasgow, although it’s a bit dated. Someone can also be a ‘useless ticket’ ie. a deadbeat/waster.

Another Glaswegianism you don’t hear much now is ‘vernear’ - a shortened version of  ‘very nearly’ - eg. “I vernear shat masel” or “that cost me vernear a hunner quid.”

Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: MiddleRabbit on March 11, 2019, 11:39:58 AM
Duck in Hull is used for a kind of small meatloaf (the food, not the fat singer).


My favorite Hull one is patty, which is colloquial slang for a ladies american back fanny.

Never heard that one - 'duck' and Iwas born there.

Tenfoot - an alley round the back of houses.  On account of being ten feet wide.

Brayed comes from 'brained', given brain damage, doesn't it?  Had your brain knocked out of your head.

'Skeg' - having a quick look at something doesn't seem to crop up anywhere apart from Hull, so far as I've heard.  'Let's have a skeg.'
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: kngen on March 11, 2019, 11:56:50 AM
More Glesga:

Glaikit - stupid. A personal favourite.

Dullyin - ety. 'a dull one'. A particularly good, well-aimed punch or kick or some sort of attack on the person. 'Aye, I skelped him a total dullyin!' Sounds a wee bit like dillion, which I imagined to be a kind of mythical high score when I was younger.

Tan - break, attack, dispense of quickly. 'Tan yer pint and let's get gaun'. Think this has a certain Adamic quality, as my American wife told me she absent-mindedly implored her colleagues to 'tan their drinks' so they could move on during a works night out, to an assemblage of blank looks.

Edgy - to keep an eye out for the police, teacher or other authority figure while some sort of miscreancy is afoot. 'Keep an edgy while I tan these windaes!'

Stauner - an erection. 'A stander'

Re: Rocket, tube, weapon, roaster. Proof that Glaswegians can turn literally any noun into an insult provided there's enough invective behind it. Particularly if there's a wee pause beforehand, as if the deliverer of the insult is mentally flicking through their internal lexicon to find the most appropriate term for the situation. 'Ya fuckin' ..... PRAWN!' as heard on the legendary plumber tape (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1glbBNXAQhY). 'Ya fucking ... SPOON!' was one me and mates ran with for a wee while after hearing our bus driver shout it out the window to a taxi driver that cut him off while we were on the way to school one day.



Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: gilbertharding on March 11, 2019, 12:04:27 PM
I know this forum doesn't represent a proper sample, but is there a reason why (so far) all the contributions to this thread have been from points to the North of the Wash/Severn line?

I was born and bred in the provincial South East (not quite East Anglia)... and I'm struggling to think of any slang, never mind obscure slang.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Morrison Lard on March 11, 2019, 12:39:04 PM
me tabs are eh so code wiiaaht an at on
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Chollis on March 11, 2019, 12:43:02 PM
Fun little dialect quiz!!! Where are you from, cunt?

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/02/15/upshot/british-irish-dialect-quiz.html?action=click&module=News&pgtype=Homepage&auth=login-smartlock

Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: gilbertharding on March 11, 2019, 12:44:38 PM
I heard today in some parts of the country a croggy goes by the name of 'pegging', which I always thought was the act of a lady giving a man a good seeing to up the arse with a strap-on dildo.

Always?

Blimey.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: ToneLa on March 11, 2019, 12:50:32 PM
As a sprog if I webbed a queg in the goolies it would probably be the harmless messing about of a child

As an adult I'd be a complete monster (web: strike. Queg: like saying "poof". Goolies: knackers)
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Voltan (Man of Steel) on March 11, 2019, 12:52:46 PM
Always?

Blimey.

My mom used to have a peg bag. God knows what was in it.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on March 11, 2019, 01:06:17 PM
My mom used to have a peg bag. God knows what was in it.

Old pickled hands divided by kingdom, phylum, order and class.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Voltan (Man of Steel) on March 11, 2019, 01:11:01 PM
Crumbs!
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 11, 2019, 01:20:32 PM
Doric has some ones I miss

Gype - (pronounced guyp') idiot.
Mink - disgusting person.
Loon - gentleman.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Shit Good Nose on March 11, 2019, 02:40:20 PM
"Nonceing" has always meant general mucking about (e.g. "look at that cat nonceing about with that piece of screwed up paper there") in parts of South-West Bristol (Yatton, Congresbury, Nailsea etc, and down to Weston-super-Mare), up until quite recently too.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: ToneLa on March 11, 2019, 03:17:45 PM
I wanna know what a "draftpak" is and why (Irvine Welsh uses it to describe nutters)

I like jakey, I like bampot (which again seems to be nutter)
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 11, 2019, 03:48:46 PM
I wanna know what a "draftpak" is and why (Irvine Welsh uses it to describe nutters)

I like jakey, I like bampot (which again seems to be nutter)

I think draftpak was a type of consumer keg. A bit like these things:
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/Giantcanofgrolsch.JPG/220px-Giantcanofgrolsch.JPG)
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 11, 2019, 03:49:40 PM
"Nonceing" has always meant general mucking about (e.g. "look at that cat nonceing about with that piece of screwed up paper there") in parts of South-West Bristol (Yatton, Congresbury, Nailsea etc, and down to Weston-super-Mare), up until quite recently too.

Let's not forget the rapper:

(https://img.discogs.com/gjSkO-5n5leRY5l_3Un6X-sXgCQ=/fit-in/500x500/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-1367306-1476287478-2040.jpeg.jpg)
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: ToneLa on March 11, 2019, 03:57:59 PM
I think draftpak was a type of consumer keg. A bit like these things:
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/Giantcanofgrolsch.JPG/220px-Giantcanofgrolsch.JPG)

Yeah, there's a bit in Trainspotting where Begbie wants Renton to bring a draftpak and Rents goes "there will be some draftpaks getting filled in on the way doon alright!"

But why does it mean nutter? Is it like drinking Stella makes you out to be a violent nutter, sort of thing?
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: hummingofevil on March 11, 2019, 03:58:44 PM
"Nonceing" has always meant general mucking about (e.g. "look at that cat nonceing about with that piece of screwed up paper there") in parts of South-West Bristol (Yatton, Congresbury, Nailsea etc, and down to Weston-super-Mare), up until quite recently too.

Is it Bristolians who use "Gurt lush"? I like that.

I had a long chat with a Doric speaker in Aberdeen and there are plenty of words in Doric that have Geordie counterparts. The obvious one is "glaikit" in Doric who's Geordie equivalent is "glakey". It means a someone who is a bit of an idiot; a dafty; it insulting but its not brutal. I think it comes from Middle English which preceded both Geordie and Scots. Feel free to correct me though.

---

My random word fact of the day is the word Gibber comes from the Angloromani word Jib which means language. It was used as an insult for Roma who were speaking unintelligibly in their own language or "speaking Jibber" "Jibberish".

Here is one for the southerners:

The word "yob" is the only word in common English usage that originated in cockney market backslang (similar to Verlan in Paris is was a slang language developed so traders could speak to each other without customers understanding to keep prices high - maybe). If you haven't worked it out it simply means 'boy'.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: xxxx xxx x xxx on March 11, 2019, 04:08:14 PM
Desolation.


Not particularly, he's just made that up.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Blinder Data on March 11, 2019, 04:32:27 PM
Not particularly, he's just made that up.

What a Leeds thing to do.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Shit Good Nose on March 11, 2019, 04:57:00 PM
Is it Bristolians who use "Gurt lush"? I like that.

Yes, but less and less - it's been falling out of fashion for quite a while and a lot of Bristolians younger than 30 don't use it, and many of those haven't even heard of it before.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Pingers on March 11, 2019, 07:22:36 PM
I forgot "mashing" which in Sheffield is the act of making a pot or a cup of tea: "Ah've just mashed". Gives rise to "a reyt bag o' mashings" meaning a proper assortment.

Also, your grandmother is your nanan, but only in Sheffield as far as I can tell. Certainly not anywhere else in South Yorkshire, where she's your nana.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on March 11, 2019, 08:13:27 PM
Not particularly, he's just made that up.

Quote
“That’s Leeds is that”

Translation: “That’s fantastic

https://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/ten-phrases-you-ll-only-hear-in-leeds-1-7451643

Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: holyzombiejesus on March 11, 2019, 08:27:21 PM
I love 'nowty'. Is 'seeing your arse' (in a strop) a regional thing or is it nationwide?

Also, I have friends from Flint and they use the word 'burmo' to describe something that tries really hard to be fashionable but never will be, like Next.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: hummingofevil on March 11, 2019, 08:49:57 PM
I love 'nowty'. Is 'seeing your arse' (in a strop) a regional thing or is it nationwide?

Also, I have friends from Flint and they use the word 'burmo' to describe something that tries really hard to be fashionable but never will be, like Next.

I can’t quite do justice to “seen yer arse“ in writing as it needs that Wrexham town centre accent to really make it sing. Could be NE Wales thing.

It’s sister saying “I wuz ohright till I seen yo” is another mangling of language I only hear in Wrexham.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: The Culture Bunker on March 11, 2019, 09:04:34 PM
One I remembered, but I suspect may also be common in the North East, is "hoying ya ring" as in vomiting to a very extreme degree.

"I was fucked last night, ars'say, marra."
"Ya wuz hoying ya ring, aye?"

I remember one from Cleator Moor where a terrible haircut or hat was described as a "clip".

"Look at the clip on that cunt!"
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: hummingofevil on March 11, 2019, 09:58:04 PM
One I remembered, but I suspect may also be common in the North East, is "hoying ya ring" as in vomiting to a very extreme degree.

"I was fucked last night, ars'say, marra."
"Ya wuz hoying ya ring, aye?"

I remember one from Cleator Moor where a terrible haircut or hat was described as a "clip".

"Look at the clip on that cunt!"

Again both correct. Hoy just generally means throw.

Long shot but anyone here got any knowledge of speaking French in Marseille. I’ve stumbled across the word “Fada“ which i think is a general nickname for people or things from Marseille but I think it might also mean crazy and can’t work out of the headlines in France Football about which usage they are using in reference to Balotelli (both possibly).
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: buzby on March 11, 2019, 10:36:56 PM
I can’t quite do justice to “seen yer arse“ in writing as it needs that Wrexham town centre accent to really make it sing. Could be NE Wales thing.
Common in Liverpool too, similar meaning to 'got a cob on'. On a related note, we have 'face like a wet Echo/like a burst welly'.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Ray Travez on March 11, 2019, 10:57:03 PM
someone I knew would say 'face like a slapped arse'
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: alan nagsworth on March 11, 2019, 11:01:29 PM
Saying "mom" instead of "mum" - something I've been widely derided for on this forum over the years - seems to be strictly limited to very select parts of the West Midnlands. My home town Tamworth is one, as are places like West Bromwich and Walsall, but other nearby places like Burton-on-Trent and Derby do not, and absolutely nowhere else in the country does it. I've always found that really odd.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: The Culture Bunker on March 11, 2019, 11:03:39 PM
Certainly I would say "seen his/her/your arse" is a common expression across the North West of England to mean someone who has been showed up somehow. Always assumed it was an Emperor's New Clothes type thing - ie they're so humiliated it's like they're bollock naked.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: im barry bethel on March 11, 2019, 11:14:30 PM
Nowty- someone who is both moody and aggressive. Manchester, possibly obselete.

Knew someone 25 odd yes ago who used that, also mithering to keep pestering for something
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: alan nagsworth on March 11, 2019, 11:28:10 PM
Yeah, "mithering" is one my nan still uses!

Another I've not heard in years is "rigmarole" (see also, "palaver") meaning a lengthy, tiresome procedure. I just looked up the etymology and it appears it comes from "ragman roll":

Quote
Any of a collection of legal documents in which the nobility and gentry of Scotland subscribed allegiance to King Edward I of England

Cute.

One that's native to Shropshire and the black country which made its way to Tamworth was "round the Wrekin", which means taking the long way around (the Wrekin is a big hill in Shropshire). If your taxi driver went an indirect route you'd say "£6 it cost me! Cunt had me going right round the Wrekin."
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: The Culture Bunker on March 11, 2019, 11:40:35 PM
Thought of another one (again) from growing up: "vanya", as in nearly.

"That arsehole vayna clipped me in his Capri!"
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: im barry bethel on March 11, 2019, 11:41:17 PM
Another one that's just sprung to mind is mardy, along the same lines as nowty but a bit more aggressive you n it's use "ya mardy arsehole"


Edit: another one to tie in with mithering was leathering, "if I kept mithering me mam for sweets like that I'd get leathered
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: alan nagsworth on March 11, 2019, 11:44:11 PM
I always thought "mardy" quite widely known since Arctic Monkeys made a hit out of it, but down south it doesn't seem as recognised. "Having a brat mard" was common back home to describe a temper tantrum.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Jockice on March 12, 2019, 09:35:46 AM
I always thought "mardy" quite widely known since Arctic Monkeys made a hit out of it, but down south it doesn't seem as recognised. "Having a brat mard" was common back home to describe a temper tantrum.

Yeah, I had to explain to a relative in Scotland what it meant. Crabbit arse basically.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Jockice on March 12, 2019, 09:37:36 AM
Knew someone 25 odd yes ago who used that, also mithering to keep pestering for something

My favourite Fall song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgA6v3DORY4
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: popcorn on March 12, 2019, 10:20:12 AM
When I lived in Norwich my driving instructor if I'd managed to pick up any of the local twang yet and it was only later that I realised this did not mean women.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Cuellar on March 12, 2019, 10:22:37 AM
No obscure local slang from St. Albans, as far as I can tell.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: rasta-spouse on March 12, 2019, 10:36:30 AM
I've heard people say tatty bye, and have liked it.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: ToneLa on March 12, 2019, 10:38:01 AM
I don't know if it's just local but I absolutely love getting, being, and describing my drunken self as banjaxed
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Mr Banlon on March 12, 2019, 10:54:28 AM
West/North West London :
What's the koo ? (What's been going on)
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Lordofthefiles on March 12, 2019, 11:15:35 AM
Getting hit in the “knackers”.
N/E England
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: xxxx xxx x xxx on March 12, 2019, 12:07:18 PM
https://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/ten-phrases-you-ll-only-hear-in-leeds-1-7451643

Fair enough, but they're all made up apart from the third one.  Never read such pointless unLeedsness in my life.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: ToneLa on March 12, 2019, 12:16:53 PM
You are all meffs

And beauts
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: buzby on March 12, 2019, 01:10:40 PM
I don't know if it's just local but I absolutely love getting, being, and describing my drunken self as banjaxed
Irish, innit (it also appears in Waiting For Godot). There used to be an irish folk band who played the pubs in Liverpool (on Sunday afternoons The Dart, which used to be on Gildart St, where a lot of the Irish Republican community hung out after the Irish Club closed) ) called Banjax.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 12, 2019, 01:11:30 PM
I've heard people say tatty bye, and have liked it.

Shit version of 'tarrarabit'.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Cuntbeaks on March 12, 2019, 01:16:43 PM
As mentioned previously, 'Rocket', is a great descriptor for someone who is a pain in the arse. But I had to laugh laugh when i heard it taken to another level.

"Bolt ya rocket before ah launch ye"
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: gib on March 12, 2019, 05:54:59 PM
I've heard people say tatty bye, and have liked it.

Quote from: Wiktionary
Phrase coined, or made popular, by comedian Ken Dodd in the 1970s, but persisting in the language.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: jonno on March 12, 2019, 08:36:37 PM
My favourite midlands one is “it’s gone black over Bill’s mother’s” when dark clouds are gathering in the distance. Rarely heard though.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: The Boston Crab on March 12, 2019, 08:37:50 PM
Crenners - rubber johnnies
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 12, 2019, 08:42:22 PM
My favourite midlands one is “it’s gone black over Bill’s mother’s” when dark clouds are gathering in the distance. Rarely heard though.

'round the wrekin' is a good one.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Morrison Lard on March 12, 2019, 08:51:35 PM
mard arsed

gorra cob on

gorra monk on
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Voltan (Man of Steel) on March 12, 2019, 08:54:01 PM
Gambol, meaning a forward roll rather than general frolicking about. Also donnies = hands.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: hummingofevil on March 13, 2019, 03:12:16 AM
Any of you cunts Kentish men (or men of Kent)? I found this on Wikipedia and like it; Kentish dialect:

Alleycumfee - a non-existent place.
Better-most - the best, something superior
Cheesy bug - woodlouse
Dabster, a dab hand - somebody very skilled at something
Fanteeg - to be flustered
Ha'ant - "Haven't." For example, "Ha'ant yew sin 'im yet?"
Jawsy - a chatterbox
March-men - people from the borders of two counties
'Od Rabbit It! - a minced oath
Ringle - to put a ring in a pig's nose
Scithers - scissors (clippers may have been "clithers.")
Tutt - clutter (noun)
Twinge - an earwig
Wrongtake - to misunderstand
Yarping - to complain, applied to children
Addle - to be dazed or confused
Allow - to think of, consider or regard
Dumbledore - bumblebee
Dunes - sand hills or hillocks near the sea
Heft - weight
Oast - kiln for drying hops
Peaky - unwell, ill-looking
Pikey - traveller on the turnpike, i.e. a vagabond or ruffian
Radical - a troublemaker or rebel.

Some of my more trendy type London mates have been using ”allow” recently meaning (I think) “chill out” or ”leave it”. Can see how it’s root comes from “consider“ or contemplate.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: hummingofevil on March 13, 2019, 03:19:22 AM
https://youtu.be/sPJxS43ByYE

I think a lot of those words make more sense if you listen to this. The older rural accents rather than esturary / public school accents that are wiping out our linguistic heritage.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: kngen on March 13, 2019, 04:08:36 AM


Some of my more trendy type London mates have been using ”allow” recently meaning (I think) “chill out” or ”leave it”. Can see how it’s root comes from “consider“ or contemplate.

Kind of. 'Allow' is yootspeak for wanting very little to do with something. 'Allow that bare butters girl with her chattin shit' - no idea of the etymology, but I feel it comes from 'I'll allow it to happen, but I'm not getting involved'
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Lisa Jesusandmarychain on March 13, 2019, 07:33:17 AM




gorra monk on

You're not from Wigan, are you ?
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: northernrebel on March 13, 2019, 11:55:50 AM
'Antwacky' - used in the Liverpool and Cheshire area to mean 'old fashioned and naff'. Often shortened to 'twacky' but now the word is oddly dated and naff itself, ironically.

'Rorm' - to wiggle around a lot under the bedclothes. Often used by my mother in some distant era - 'will yuz lot stop rorming about' when all the inevitable siblings were in one bed in a council 'ouse. Was shocked to find it was not a proper word in the dictionary.

Also 'slutch' for mud. Yet again, it sounds muddier than any other real word.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Cuellar on March 13, 2019, 12:03:00 PM
Some of my more trendy type London mates have been using ”allow” recently meaning (I think) “chill out” or ”leave it”. Can see how it’s root comes from “consider“ or contemplate.

That was very current when I was in school in the home counties, circa 2000, meaning 'can't be bothered', or 'I will not be doing that'.

"you coming out tonight?"
"nah allow that"
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Shit Good Nose on March 13, 2019, 03:32:12 PM
The only one local to me (North Somerset) that still gets used a lot, even by the younger folk and interlopers from larger towns, is " 'ow be yon?" (as in "how are you?"), typically pronounced as "am be on?" by the older folk.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Voltan (Man of Steel) on March 13, 2019, 03:49:27 PM
A Black Country expression probably not used by anyone under sixty nowadays: “Keep out the ‘oss road”, meaning “mind how you go”.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Jerzy Bondov on March 13, 2019, 04:14:58 PM
The best bit of Cornish slang is the insult 'tuss'. BLEDDY TUSS. Feels nice to say.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: ToneLa on March 13, 2019, 04:42:00 PM
The best bit of Cornish slang is the insult 'tuss'. BLEDDY TUSS. Feels nice to say.

Aphex Twin alias gains meaning!
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Space ghost on March 14, 2019, 04:57:49 AM
Any of you cunts Kentish men (or men of Kent)? I found this on Wikipedia and like it; Kentish dialect:

Alleycumfee - a non-existent place.
Better-most - the best, something superior
Cheesy bug - woodlouse
Dabster, a dab hand - somebody very skilled at something
Fanteeg - to be flustered
Ha'ant - "Haven't." For example, "Ha'ant yew sin 'im yet?"
Jawsy - a chatterbox
March-men - people from the borders of two counties
'Od Rabbit It! - a minced oath
Ringle - to put a ring in a pig's nose
Scithers - scissors (clippers may have been "clithers.")
Tutt - clutter (noun)
Twinge - an earwig
Wrongtake - to misunderstand
Yarping - to complain, applied to children
Addle - to be dazed or confused
Allow - to think of, consider or regard
Dumbledore - bumblebee
Dunes - sand hills or hillocks near the sea
Heft - weight
Oast - kiln for drying hops
Peaky - unwell, ill-looking
Pikey - traveller on the turnpike, i.e. a vagabond or ruffian
Radical - a troublemaker or rebel.

Some of my more trendy type London mates have been using ”allow” recently meaning (I think) “chill out” or ”leave it”. Can see how it’s root comes from “consider“ or contemplate.

Man and boy and I've never heard any of these ever apart from peaky and pikey. Sounds like someone has pulled them straight out their Chatham pocket to me.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: gib on March 14, 2019, 11:20:11 AM
Man and boy and I've never heard any of these ever apart from peaky and pikey. Sounds like someone has pulled them straight out their Chatham pocket to me.

You never said something heavy was 'hefty'? What about 'dunes', surely you heard that one before.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Space ghost on March 14, 2019, 12:08:07 PM
Course. I own and operate my own hefty dune buggy. I just thought they were so common as to be automatically struck from the list.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: a duncandisorderly on March 17, 2019, 04:44:33 AM
In Newcastle we use brayed too, so I reckon NRP is a "southerner", i.e. Teeside or below.

well, at least fucking spell it right, you geordie twat. teesside. you geordie twat.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Brian Freeze on March 17, 2019, 06:01:25 AM
How about "sken" for have a look at. As in "gis a sken at yer bike"
Local to NW Lancs or more common?

Or "tit" for petrol
I've only ever heard that from Rochdaliens, anyone/where else?
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: derek stitt on March 17, 2019, 07:32:28 AM
Quist - wood pigeon

Bellock - shout

Ronk - sly

Browse - rhymes with louse but means twigs

Nithered - cold

Nogman - twat

Squit -  talking nonsense

Only the old use words like this in my part of rural Gloucestershire and it’s only young fogeys like me that understand them. Hang on just thought of another one ....

Ooot - rhymes with foot but means ought to
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: a duncandisorderly on March 17, 2019, 09:28:55 PM
'Antwacky' - used in the Liverpool and Cheshire area to mean 'old fashioned and naff'. Often shortened to 'twacky' but now the word is oddly dated and naff itself, ironically.


"twacky" cropped up in brookside scripts a fair bit, often for tracy corkhill to say (& I'll have to go on fb now & remind justine of this). I was puzzled by this at the time, because I'm from teesside & we have our own regional affectations in smoggy-land. turns out that "antwacky", its full form, is just a mispronunciation of 'antique'.

"bifters" was another one I heard on the set a lot, in the script or otherwise. I knew the word as slang for a joint (reefer), but it would be applied to anything where some considerable effort had been applied to a task, e.g. making an ordinary car look like a police car for the purposes of a shoot.

the scousers I worked with were adaptable, & coped quite well with the things I imported from teesside, like 'skeg'; "let's have a skeg at that" = "permit me to examine that object whilst holding it".  I'll remember more presently.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: Nice Relaxing Poo on March 17, 2019, 09:42:33 PM


the scousers I worked with were adaptable, & coped quite well with the things I imported from teesside, like 'skeg'; "let's have a skeg at that" = "permit me to examine that object whilst holding it".  I'll remember more presently.

Skeg is one I use to this day even though I haven't lived within 200 miles of Teesside for 20 years.
Title: Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
Post by: a duncandisorderly on March 18, 2019, 07:20:35 AM
Skeg is one I use to this day even though I haven't lived within 200 miles of Teesside for 20 years.

whereabouts? I was born in bradford ("bratf'd") but raised dragged up in marske-by-the-sea, where (as a teenager) my careers advisor would point out of the window of the classroom at the not-very-distant ICI & british steel complexes up the road & say "or you could become a teacher".
exile, via liverpool, to london & points beyond, soon followed.

so did you give people croggies on your bike?

I work in broadcast engineering, & briefly ended up at chrysalis in camden, while Mtv were still clients there- I went with them when they moved over the road into the TVam building & stayed 17 years, travelling all over europe while the viacom empire grew. but at chrysalis, I ran into another engineer who had a smoggy accent.....

"are you from the north east?" I asked.
"teesside, aye."
"where in teesside?"
"little village called mask" [that being how we say it]
"where in mask?"
"the kirklands. why?"
"fuckin' 'ell! what number, like?"
"eleven. why?"
"I used to live at number eight!"

I mean, I wouldn't want to paint it, but...